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Land-grant railroads and their relation to government transportation by Robert E. Shannon

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Published by Govt. print. off. in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Military Transportation,
  • Railroad land grants

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementA lecture delivered before the officers of the Quartermaster reserve corps at Washington, D.C., June 26, 1917
Classifications
LC ClassificationsUC313 .S48
The Physical Object
Pagination20 p.
Number of Pages20
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL26424654M
LC Control Number17000139

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  Railroads and Land Grant Policy: A Study in Government Intervention attempts to replace a major part of the railroad land grant legend (according to which the granting of federal and state land to private railroad firms benefitted these firms more than it contributed to society as a whole) with some real numbers and Edition: 1. Description Railroads and Land Grant Policy: A Study in Government Intervention attempts to replace a major part of the railroad land grant legend (according to which the granting of federal and state land to private railroad firms benefitted these firms more than it contributed to society as a whole) with some real numbers and analysis. Land grant map showing drainage, cities and towns, townships, transportation network and main railroads in heavy lines. Contributor: G.W. & C. Colton & Co. - Burlington and Missouri River Railroad Company Date:   “Between and the United States government used a portion of the public domain (federally owned land) to assist and encourage the building of railroads.” (1) This was given in the form of so-called “land grants” to help defray the costs of constructing the railroads. Land was granted only after rail had been laid.

  For the land grant system to work as planned, the government hoped railroads would sell their lands to help pay for the construction costs of laying rail lines. The problem was that very few people wanted to buy any land until after rail lines were constructed. In Railroads and American Political Development Zachary Callen tells the story of the federal government’s role in developing a national rail system—and the rail system’s role in expanding the power of the federal government. At the same time that homesteaders were getting free land from the government, large tracts of land were granted to railroads by both the states and the federal government. The goal was to encourage the railroads to build their tracks where few people lived, and to help settle the country. The government grants helped to build railroads with large scale corruption because with the government handing out large amounts of money local politicians became greedy. Each politician, of.

Land grants and bond subsidies and their bearing on maximum rates for railroad transportation /([Lincoln, Neb., ]), by Nebraska. Board of Transportation and W. . The grants from the federal government can be divided roughly into three categories: aids to transcontinental systems, to midwestern regional railroads, and to southern Reconstruction railroads. The shares of total land granted were approximat 15, and 8 percent, respectively, justifying the emphasis on the former. This noteworthy book deals with federal land grants made from the public domain to a number of states to build transcontinental railroads during the nineteenth century. RAILROADS, FEDERAL LAND GRANTS TO (ISSUE) Between and the United States government used a portion of the public domain (federally owned land) to assist and encourage the building of railroads. In all, during that twenty-one year period approximately million acres of land were transferred to private ownership. Source for information on Railroads, Federal Land Grants to .